Why 1866 Set the Stage for Two World Wars

When some search for the roots of the First World War, there is a tendency to look towards the Balkans. After all, it was the assassination of the Archduke Franz Ferdinand of the Austro-Hungarian Empire in Serbia in 1914 that precipitated the kick-off of the greatest and most deadly bar-brawl in the history of the … Continue reading Why 1866 Set the Stage for Two World Wars

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Use of Force: 7 U.S. Military Actions You’ve Never Heard Of

Last week, the U.S. hit a Syrian airfield with 59 cruise missiles as retaliation for Syria’s alleged use of banned nerve agents on its own civilian population. Some have questioned whether or not the strike went too far or perhaps did not go far enough. Many - including myself - equated it to the Clinton … Continue reading Use of Force: 7 U.S. Military Actions You’ve Never Heard Of

” Look! Here are the Americans!” The U.S. in World War I and Popular Memory

One hundred years ago this week, the United States entered World War I. “Too late to make a difference!” say some, often British or Commonwealth. “Should never have joined it at all,” say others, usually non-interventionist Americans. “World war what?” say many, usually all other Americans. “Thank you,” say a great many, almost always French. No … Continue reading ” Look! Here are the Americans!” The U.S. in World War I and Popular Memory

Not in our Time: A Warning

Time is a strange thing. This coming April 6, World War I and the United States turn 100. 100 years since Congress declared war on the German Empire. 100 years since U.S. Doughboys, carrying automatic weapons and wearing steel helmets, marched off to war in France, in Belgium, in Italy, and in Siberia.  These troops … Continue reading Not in our Time: A Warning

When the United States Army Went to War Armed with French Weapons

France. What a silly place, am I right? They eat frogs, they're on their, like, millionth government since the Revolution, and they keep needing us 'Muricans to save them during world wars. Well, that is one way of viewing the Franco-American narrative, I suppose, if one were to overlook the incredibly vital French aid during the American … Continue reading When the United States Army Went to War Armed with French Weapons

“Mine DTS Papers are Denied:” Letter Home from an Admin Clerk in the Continental Army

A recently discovered letter from a Massachusetts militiaman in the Continental Army reveals what life was like for the brave men fighting in the American Revolution. The letter is presented here in its original form, with the lower case "s" appearing as it would have at the time since the tendency was to put a … Continue reading “Mine DTS Papers are Denied:” Letter Home from an Admin Clerk in the Continental Army

How the Current Generation Is Dishonoring the Greatest Generation

Today’s guest post comes from Barefoot Boomer. Boomer is a career Army officer and strategist. He is also a historian with an emphasis in American and German military history.  The content and opinions of this article are the author’s only and do not reflect the opinions of the United States Army or the Department of Defense. The … Continue reading How the Current Generation Is Dishonoring the Greatest Generation

Anatomy of a World War I Artillery Barrage

A lot has been said about the role of artillery in World War I, in both its intensity and ferocity. On the opening day of the Somme on July 1, 1916, British guns hurled 250,000 high explosive and shrapnel shells towards German positions. During the beginning of the Battle of Passchendaele in 1917, over 3,000 … Continue reading Anatomy of a World War I Artillery Barrage

Walking a World War I Battlefield

I've been to a lot of battlefields: from the American Revolution, the War of 1812, and the Civil War. Most are neatly marked with "this thing happened here" or "Robert E. Lee's horse drank from a puddle here." I've even been to a few from the Soviet-Afghan War and Operation Enduring Freedom, although I saw … Continue reading Walking a World War I Battlefield

Tolkien and Combat Stress: Writing as a Release

I’ve been mulling over this idea of going back and revisiting old favorites, both in literature and film. If you’re like me, you read a lot of books growing up and probably had your favorites that you revisited time and again. Same with movies, TV shows, and documentaries. As we’ve gotten older – and our … Continue reading Tolkien and Combat Stress: Writing as a Release